21 Following
annehart

annehart

How to videorecord your dog's life history for a documentary

Book and photo by  Anne Hart

How to Video Record Your Dog's Life Story: Excerpt--Sample Chapter

 
Book Excerpt: Browse Sample Chapter.

How to Video Record Your Dog's Life Story: Writing, Financing, & Producing Pet Documentaries, Drama, or News.

How to Video Record Your Dog's Life Story
Writing, Financing, & Producing Pet Documentaries, Drama, or News


© By Anne Hart

Here's how to video record your dog's life story or make a movie, DVD, or time capsule starring your dog included in your intergenerational family.
Published July 2007 by ASJA Press imprint, iUniverse, Inc. Call 1-800-AUTHORS, or visit http://www.iuniverse.com.
ISBN: 978-0-595-45798-4

Book Title: How to Video Record Your Dog's Life Story: Writing, Financing, & Producing Pet Documentaries, Drama, or News

By Anne Hart

Publisher's price: $16.95
Format: Paperback
Size: 6 x 9
Pages: 195
ISBN: 0-595-45798-3
Published: Jul-2007

Here's how to video record your dog's life story or make a movie, DVD, or Time Capsule starring your dog included in your intergenerational family.

Book Description

Your dog deserves a "celebration of life" video. Here's how to video record your dog's life story or make a movie, DVD, training documentary, or Time Capsule starring your dog included in your intergenerational family.


Learn to record your dog's life story. Nearly everybody uses a camcorder to make videos of the family dog or takes pictures and puts them in a scrapbook to remember a dog as part of a family.

Put your videos on DVDs, Flash Drives, CDs, or save to your computer linked to your camcorder for editing. From the time you first bring home a new puppy, a "this is your life" video podcast or disc of your dog's memorable moments can become part of a family history video newsletter or keepsake heirloom album.

Learn how to conserve, protect videos, diaries, scrapbooks, or photos in digital or acid-free paper scrap books. Produce a personal, family, or salable video starring you and your dog. If you want to make the video available to others, you'll find instruction here on how to write, finance, produce, distribute, publicize, launch, promote, and market salable dog documentaries that include intergenerational family video newsletters or videos that feature prominently dogs or any pet.

How to Video Record Your Dog’s Life Story
Writing, Financing, & Producing Pet Documentaries, Drama, or News

By Anne Hart

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapters


1 Budgets: How to Finance the Video Recording of Your Dog’s Life Story or a Pet-Related Video/Documentary as a Celebration of Life
2 Writing a Dog-Related Video Script
3 Using Episodes to Create Dog-Training, Dog Camp, or Dog Day Care DVDs without Formal Scripts
4 The Genres of Dog-Related DVDs
5 Simplicity Sells Dog Videos or Pet Documentaries
6 How to Write a Dog’s Life Story-Based Documentary Video Script from a Novel
7 What Are Producers Buying in Dog-Related Documentary Video Scripts?
8 Your Step-by-Step Dog Documentary Should Emphasize Problem-Solving and Achieving Results
9 Producing Media Tours for Dogs and Their Handlers
10 What are the Hot Topics in Dog Video Production Circles?
Resources: Appendix 1 Appendix 4
Appendix 2 Appendix 5
Appendix 3 Appendix 6
Index


***

Introduction
Your dog deserves a “celebration of life” video. This book is about how to video record your dog’s life story. Here’s how to video record your dog’s life story or make a movie, DVD, training documentary, or Time Capsule starring your dog included in your intergenerational family. You’ll also learn how to write a documentary script for narration, prepare a budget, and research financing, distribution, promotion and marketing resources.

To simplify, all you may want to do is make a video of your dog at different times. But perhaps you also may want to create a salable DVD about dogs and their care, training, or fun.

Nearly everybody uses a camcorder to make videos of the family dog or takes pictures and puts them in a scrapbook to remember a dog as part of a family. Put your videos on DVDs, Flash Drives, CDs, or save to your computer linked to your camcorder for editing.

From the time you first bring home a new puppy, a “this is your life” video podcast or disc of your dog’s memorable moments can become part of a family history video newsletter or keepsake heirloom album.

Learn how to conserve, protect videos, diaries, scrapbooks, or photos in digital or acid-free paper scrap books. Produce a personal, family, or salable video starring you and your dog. If you want to make the video available to others, you’ll find instruction here on how to write, finance, produce, distribute, publicize, launch, promote, and market dog documentaries that include intergenerational family video newsletters or videos that feature prominently dogs or any pet.

You can save your video in your personal computer, or keep in on a DVD, flash drive, or even upload it to Google or YouTube. Maybe you’ll put your dog video in a time capsule or gift box protected from light damage. Then you can keep actual preserved and conserved photos in a scrap book of favorite scenes from the video printed out on photo paper and laminated to keep from fading as quickly.

You’ll store it in a cool, dark place, away from water damage and air or breath moisture, perhaps your dog videos might end up as photos enlarged and put on a plaque or framed, or passed from DVD to other disc or chip-like devices where people can view your work on a computer or buy the DVDs from a catalog, gift, or pet shop, of your dog in any stage of the pet’s life story. Your dog video is a celebration of life.

And just in case you want to take a step further and make the video available to others, you’ll find instruction here on how to write, finance, produce, distribute, publicize, launch, promote, and market dog documentaries on dog training, care, camp, running, walking, sitting, spa activities, knitting, sewing, building, housing, walking on leash, health, nutrition, travel or adventure videos on DVD or similar formats. Use your personal computer and your camcorder linked together for editing your dog documentaries, features, learning materials, courses, or training videos.

Write dog-related audio-visual scripts and turn them into reality-based documentaries for information, travel, or education. Use the Internet’s Web to syndicate and disseminate your content in text, audio, or video formats. Or save your videos to DVDs, flash drives, and other devices for viewing, either interactive or audience-feedback based.

Popular subjects for linking your personal computer to your camcorder can be anything from dog-related world or local travel, your lectures, or life issues. You can link your personal computer to the tapes in your camcorder and broadcast at home part time or whatever hours you desire. Feature travel with dogs or dog-sled adventures or how-to DVDs dealing with dogs.

Write, finance, and produce documentary or how-to DVDs showing new approaches to dog training based on dog behavior. Emphasize non-violent techniques to win the dog’s loyalty, love, and trust.

Develop a DVD that shows the viewer how to develop enduring bonds of trust with a dog so that the dog cooperates. Your DVD doesn’t have to show negative approaches or those images of doggy torture chambers from old days past training that focused solely on “leashes and collars or tethers” or cages that restricted dogs.
The dog need not be put on a tether in some yard to show how a dog is trained. Keep away from negative methods of the past.

Instead create a learning environment in a how-to training video. You solve a problem in training by teaching the dog positive associations with the handler. Your DVD needs to compare negative associations a dog can figure out that might increase aggression in dominant dogs with positive associations and alternative gentle training methods.

You don’t have to control the dog by punishment. You don’t have to encourage aggression or dog resentment and mistrust. Instead, your dog training or care DVD can focus on gentle methods such as clicker conditioning and similar methods that emphasize creating wonderfully positive.

Before you even start a plan for your dog DVD, talk to book authors that offer newer approaches. For example, the book titled, Let The Dog Decide: The Revolutionary 15-Minute-A-Day Program to Train Your Dog—Gently and Reliably, by pioneer dog trainer Dale Stavroff (http://www.precisiondogs.com) explains in depth information about the unnatural role for a person to be the alpha pack leader of dogs. Instead, the book uses a different approach to clicker conditioning, emphasizing effective training techniques.

In your video, talk to people who have written dog-training or dog care books to see what new information and direction is available. This way, you won’t repeat the same material in your video, documentary, or how-to DVD that already has been done in most books. Interview people that train people to train dogs. Talk to veterinarians, dog behaviorists, consultants, book authors, and producers of animal training documentaries.

***

Chapter 1

Budgets: How to Finance the Video Recording of Your Dog’s Life Story or a Pet-Related Video/Documentary as a Celebration of Life


Each scene in your video is a celebration of your dog’s life as part of your family and/or your dog’s workday. It’s simple to video record your dog’s life story. You frame the picture so that the dog is in the center of the ‘shot.’ Make a video clip (or a movie) highlighting significant events in your dog’s life, and include it in your annual family video newsletter.

You can video record any pet to include in a time capsule, digital scrap book, or gift box of memorabilia usually reserved for family history updates, reunions, or periodical newsletters. Save the stages of your pet’s life on disc or flash drive, and mail the event to your family, friends, or students. Look at the Web site on Special Interest Videotapes at: http://www.dot.state.il.us/blr/printfriendly.pdf.

After you produce your video, you then edit the video to show the dog as the main focus. You hold the camcorder so that the sun is not in the lens, and you keep your finger away from the lens. Since you can’t interview your dog to ask for the highlights, turning points, and significant events of your pet’s life story, you can make a skit focusing on your dog’s life stages, play, performance, agility, tricks, or interaction and connection with members of your family or yourself.

Then put the video in a time capsule so you will remember the happy and memorable times as a celebration of life of your dog. Think of the video as an adoption event, the inclusion of the dog into your own family or household. Then treat your dog as an athlete. You can even make videos of dog massage techniques or focus on one area of your dog’s life story and interaction or connection with you and the dog as family.

Video record your dog every few weeks from the time you bring the dog home as a puppy to the precious time you spend with your dog in the dog’s golden years. Video record your dog’s life story in the same way as you would record a relative’s life story and save the video to a DVD and other technology. Then upload the video to a Web site or save it in the hard drive of your computer.

The best way to video record your dog is to use your camcorder for close-ups and pull-backs, zoom ‘ins’ and zoom ‘outs’ while the dog works with a trainer or handler—either yourself or a professional trainer. Record your dog at some dog shows, in the park, on vacation, at home, eating, playing with other dogs, performing agility work, doing tricks, retrieving, rounding up sheep, or doing what your dog breed does naturally.

The proliferation of dog camps, training, and daycare are burgeoning genres for making DVD documentaries on working with dogs. You can make a wide variety of deals with videographers and others that train, record, photograph, care for, treat, entertain, or supply dogs—either for no fee or a very low fee, or for a percentage of profits.

The main fact about the budgets is they get you started and you can decrease or increase the line items according to your own requirements. It is not expensive to produce your dog training, dog camp, dog daycare, or other dog-related DVD. Because dog training is so wide spread, if done right, you could make a healthy profit on this idea (think series of DVDs). But make sure you have a name trainer if you can get one or a name dog.

In the book titled Film & Video Budgets, Deke Simon with Michael Wiese, 4th updated edition, Michael Wiese Productions, Studio City, CA (http://mwp.com). 2006, you’ll find in the book the Web site address for several excellent downloadable free budgets in Excel format that you can customize as part of the book purchase. The appendices also contain a wide variety of film and video budgets.

If you produce your dog-training DVDs using digital format, you should know that there is a lot less signal loss (actually no perceptible signal loss) to the average ear even after a few generations away from your original master recording. Professional recordings are done using Digital BetaCam also known as DigiBeta, with four channels of audio, which in digital tape format, means industrial quality. It’s a high-quality tape used to make master recordings. Your master tape is duplicated for safe keeping and also saved to a master DVD. Then the DVDs are duplicated. Editing can be done on your computer or on various digital editing machines made to work with industrial-quality tapes.

DigiBeta tape is not expensive. It runs about $30 (as this book goes to press) for a few minutes more than an hour of recording time. Another type of recording tape is Sony’s MiniDV or DVcamcorder tape or VTRs. When buying DV camcorder tape, look for brands that present fewer visible dropouts, such as Sony’s DV camcorder tape.

Corporate Sponsors, Dog Book Publishers, and Advertisers: How to Find a Sponsor to Underwrite the Marketing Costs for Your Video

First look for corporate sponsors, dog book publishers, and advertisers. To find financing for your dog-related videos, also contact various documentary associations, specialized dog-care, food, and health-related groups, dog camps, hotels that allow dogs with guests or have separate dog-related facilities at the hotel, dog-related groups, and film and video financing groups.

Sponsored DVDs, and other entertainment or instruction on disks provide a chance for producers and writers to have their special digital video proposals and scripts financed by corporate sponsors before they produce them. To get your video sponsored, you'll have to approach an advertiser or a corporation.

Ask the corporation or advertiser to underwrite the marketing effort for your video. Or ask your sponsor to buy many of your DVDs, videotapes, flash drives, Web-based training courses, or other videos and documentaries on a variety of viewing devices to give away with a contest, an offer, resell, or to sell prepackaged with another product, or to sell in some other way, as with corporate advertising on the back of the package.

If you're in a beginner's position where you can't sell your videos the old fashioned way, ask corporations or advertisers to sponsor your video with full or partial financing. Try making a video about enhancing the corporation's image in some way.

Make sure your video allows the corporation's merchandise or services to be shown in a favorable light, promoted, or sold on the video. If the video will in some way help the corporation or advertiser to make a profit, chances are, the firm will finance or sponsor your video. If you make a sports video about golf or golf instruction, ask a golf bag manufacturer to finance your video, for example.

Let a restaurant chain sponsor your food or eating for fitness video. Ask travel, outdoors, automobile, adventurer/explorer, or geographic subject matter magazines or book publishers to finance or sponsor your travel, auto trip, or visual anthropology videos. Feature celebrity narrators or hosts.

Query consumer publications on how to buy smarter, cut expenses, and get higher quality for less money. People want to learn how to save money and find hidden markets for better merchandise at lower prices. Show in a documentary that you get what you pay for.

Target a niche market of cautious consumers seeking the best-rated products at the lowest cost. Contact men's and women's interest magazines to finance your videos on career tactics, the singles scene, and success stories aimed at a specific audience such as upscale career women, young male professionals, or downwardly mobile unemployed middle-aged college graduates cut loose by corporate downsizing.

Pick your own audience. Then pick a chain of magazines or book publishers catering to that market. Finally, ask them to finance your video and sponsor it. Ask book publishers to finance your how-to videos adapted from their most successful books. For example, if you want to make a how-to guide video on a subject such as a reality video series, bar tendering, or how to pick the right date or mate, approach the publisher of books on that subject and/or the author, and ask the publisher to finance your videos adapted from the books.

Focus on corporate image and marketing techniques, not on what the video program will be about. Sponsors are interested in how you plan to make a profit for them by financing your video. Effectiveness is evaluated only in terms of cost per thousand videocassettes.

Your financers are well aware that only a few people will buy the tapes. It really is cheaper for your sponsors to purchase newspaper and television ads. Your only selling point is in aiming at a very specialized audience who will buy the sponsor's product with the tape, and the summarized point that your video will be priced very, very cheap.

The way to get over the hurdle is to convince sponsors that only your tape will demonstrate a zillion ways your sponsor's product will be of use to the viewer. Connect socially with other video producers by joining documentary producers and videographers’ associations. Show corporations how many different ways their products can be used, new ways--on video.

Find as many new ways to distribute your video as you can. And while you're doing that, find more ways to show how your sponsor's services or merchandise can be distributed as well. If you really want to find a corporate sponsor to finance your video, your best marketing tool is a profitable enticement.

Whatever genre you choose, making money with your video camera is open to new developments in other fields, such as computer software, teleconferencing, or distance teaching.

Bring together two completely different fields and form a whole new third genre, story, technology, niche market, or use for your video camera. Develop your negotiation skills.

According to what comes most naturally, choose one or more of these best ways to make money with your video camera. They are the best businesses in terms of their potential for financial success and work.

In the mid-nineties, Texas Instruments introduced a set of chips that it hoped would make video compact discs as common as audio CDs. The company produces VHS-quality video and CD-quality sound for the emerging Video CD standard developed by JVC, Matsushita, Philips, and Sony.

So as technology changes, so does a writing career. Now you can use your video or digital video camera to build on the popularity of audio CDs. Use the emerging technology to create full motion video and VCR-like features.

You can fast forward, freeze frame, or reverse. The chip uses compression technology to bring forth video images as good as videotape, but with better sound quality. Where do you use the new video CDs first? Make music videos or full-length movies with your video camera and transfer your results to Video DVD or for short lengths, CD.
Play your full-length movie from one or two five-inch CDs. You'll have the same random-access digital technology quality as you get from audio CDs. The Video CD doesn't provide as sharp an image as the laser disc, but the CDs cost a lot less.

Video CD uses the major cost reductions that apply to audio CDs. It’s these types of subjects that freelance writer can research and write about as new technology emerges to create art and science. In the mid-nineties, big-name movie companies, such as MGM, Paramount, Columbia, and major record companies began planning to offer Video CD products.

Today, writers watch for the hardware in stores and write all types of reviews and articles about how art meets technology. For example, you can write about how video DVD players and recorders, audio CD players, camcorders, and TV recorders let anyone publish a book, a Blog, a diary, or make a documentary video. Write about the technology that lets anyone publish anything online or put a life story on a DVD, CD, or the Web.

Use camcorder tape when you are making low-budget videos or documentaries. For example, if you record a one-hour video using Digital Master DVCamcorder stock, it would cost about $18-$20 on average as a ballpark figure. Regular DV Camcorder stock cost less for the same length than Digital Master DV Camcorder stock. Sony also makes HDCAM, which is Sony’s high definition digital tape. An hour recording time’s worth of Sony’s HDCAM stock costs about $60-$62 at this time.

Panasonic also makes high definition stock called DVCPro. You’d pay about $67-$68 at this time for 46 minutes of DVCPro stock.

If you ship your video outside the USA, you need to transform it to a different standard. NTSC and PAL are but two standards used around the world for recording and playing back videos. The standards may not be compatible in various countries. The USA uses NTSC. PAL is used in the UK and in some European nations.

PAL runs at 25 frames per second with 625 lines of video data per frame. NTSC runs at 30 frames per second with 525 lines of video data per frame. But PAL has better resolution than NTSC. Actually, it’s the film producers who more often use PAL for editing and production so they can enlarge their edited videos for theatrical release and turn a video master into a 35mm film.

Always keep duplicates of your master tape and master DVD. There are far more details involved in making a film than in writing a book on the same subject. To sell your DVDs on dog training, care, camping, travel, or health, you might want to combine writing travel guides with producing dog-centric videos for people taking their dogs on trips or for training anyone interested in opening a dog daycare center, dog camp, or training dog trainers and pet sitters. One idea might be travels through Europe or across the country by RV with your dog.

Before you begin to write a script or a plan calling for a voice-over narration of your video episodes, you need to plan your budget to see how much you can afford to spend on making a dog-training DVD. You’d have to plan a budget for the software needed to turn a master tape into a DVD using your personal computer. It’s called desktop video. The first step in planning is to work up an easy-to-follow budget.

Here are two low budget format samples you can use to write, finance, and produce and duplicate your own dog-related DVD. The first assumes you won’t hire a writer to write a script for your documentary. The second sample budget includes a $1,000 fee for a writer to create a one-hour script. Most dog-related DVDs run from one hour on one DVD disc to four hours on two DVD discs.

Secure a good sound system. The average camcorder doesn’t pick up sound that good for industrial-quality training videos. Get yourself a sound package. Your camcorder or video camera needs a separate microphone. You’d wear headphones so you can hear what the camera is recording. You can rent equipment if you don’t want to buy microphones and cameras. You’ll need a permit to record video in an area on a particular day. It’s part of location expenses.

What to Include in Your Budget

Your budget should include sound, mixers, booms, microphones, rentals, transportation, gas/oil, tripod, field monitor, cables, narration or voice over, background music for emphasis, and permits. Below is a video low-budget courtesy of Michael Wiese, Michael Wiese Productions. Create your own budget.
For a simple training or dog-camp video, the average budget costs around $7,445. For a student film budget, according to the Michael Wiese online site of film, video and documentary budgets, the average cost rises to $12,443. If you want to produce a digital low-budget (no-budget) feature, the cost, according to the Wiese site, rises to $19,771.

For an industrial/training film budget, the production cost rises to $76,366, according to Wiese’s site, and the production cost for a digital feature, rises to $ 215,967. If you want to see the other budgets with specific details for film or video, I highly recommend looking at the excellent film and video budgets at Michael Wiese’s Web site specifically for the budgets, which is given in his excellent book titled, Film & Video Budgets, 4th Updated Edition, by Deke Simon with Michael Wiese, published by Michael Wise Productions, Studio City, CA. 2006. Also view Wiese’s general informational Web page and http://www.mwp.com.

When you produce a dog-training, dog-camp, care, or health-related video, you want to see budget costs in detail—specifics. The costs are different if you write the script yourself, don’t use a specifically written script for narration, or hire a scriptwriter. For example, on a simple low-budget dog-training video, the cost of a scriptwriter would be zero if you wrote the narration yourself and narrated the video.

You can train the dog yourself or show video clips of others training various dogs. Or you can do a reality-television montage of clips or interview people while the dog is the center focus of the video. Another technique is to video record dogs at play at a dog camp, an exercise or yoga studio, or in daycare. You can focus on interviewing veterinarians and veterinary technicians on nutrition preparation or send out marketing questionnaires to see what type of dog-related videos people from a general audience will buy compared to what veterinarians, guide dog trainers, or nutritionists will buy.

One concept might be “treat your dog like an athlete.” Another video might focus on massage as therapy for dogs or dogs performing tricks, such as participating in a basketball game. Before you write any script, narration, or take any video clips, first do a marketing research study to see what type of dog-related videos currently are in demand and what will be in demand next year when your video is completed.

Are you going to produce a dog-related video to show to vendors and conventioneers at a trade show for dog-related products? Is your video emphasizing how to build dog houses or sew costumes for dogs? Or are you making a promotional video for a dog camp or hotel that caters to people that travel with dogs? Let’s discuss the low-budget documentary, which most beginning producers will want to emphasize.

You’ll need to know what type of camera and tape or DVD to record on and how to edit your work using your personal computer versus and older-style editing machine that uses tape. Most video cameras today are made for educational/industrial use or for amateurs to record personal videos that are not yet of industrial quality to show on television.

Your digital high 8 tape-based camcorder is still amateur quality, even though home videos made with this medium are sometimes shown on the news or on television programs that purchase or use (free) home-made videos that have recorded with digital high 8 tape. Using DVDs to record your video poses an editing problem in your computer.

Before we get to what camera to use for a low-budget dog-related documentary, let’s first look at a sample budget. By looking at budgets first, you can plan what to spend on a camcorder or other type of video camera before you even begin to write your script for narration.

Here’s one low-cost documentary sample budget, reprinted with written permission, courtesy of Michael Wiese Productions. You’ll need to adjust the figures to meet your own area’s prices and personal expenses for production costs. Michael Wiese recommends, “Modifying the budget for a dog video DVD which may be more useful and to the point for your audience.”


***
<annehart@pacbell.net>
How Much Does It Cost To Produce A Dog-Training Documentary Video?

Almost anyone can make a video of a dog by aiming a camcorder in enough light and taping or using a DVD or other means of recording video to a drive. If you don’t want to make a salable video, you can make an amateur family dog video and upload your video to Google or UTube. The first point to remember is not to point the lens into the sunlight. Your back should be against the sun when you video record. And there should be a minimum of background noise.

If you do want to make a salable dog video, for example how to train your dog, or what happens to dogs at dog camp, spa, daycare, training puppies, agility, dog-show preparation, traveling with dogs, camping with dogs, working with guide dogs, or dogs with jobs and therapy dog training, you’ll need to think about a budget larger than a camcorder, a reel of tape or a DVD disc or flash drive. Whatever means you choose, save your video to your computer’s hard drive and to a disc or flash drive.

You’ll need a good master video to work from. When using tape, the more copies you make, the worse the copies look when you view them, in most cases. So decide whether your budget allows you to buy an industrial-quality video camera, a high-end amateur video camcorder, or a simple family video digital eight or DVD-type camcorder.
If you can work out deals with students of video production at local colleges or community colleges, and even some high-school media programs, you can find low-cost or free camera help in exchange for college or school credits and work experience references.

A low-budget video production runs around $7,000 to $8,500, depending upon whether you write your own script, get a free script from a student, or work in reality television genre using a general script denoting scenes and locations of various training commands. The low-budget video/documentary form included in this chapter works with an approximately $7,500 budget.

The blank budget forms are for use with a low-budget documentary reality video for dog training or care, and for a more expensive dramatic production that includes dramatizations using actors to recreate training possibilities and situations resembling a dramatization of a real-life event commonly found in events and situations that occur at dog camps, dog spas, dog daycare, or training encounters based on your experience or the experience of the dog and trainer you are video recording. You’ll need a script at least to follow and focus on the various episodes and segments you’ll edit whether you use reality events or dramatizations.

Planning a Script for a Shoe-String Budget Dog Video


Your goal as a DVD producer of a salable dog life story video is to expand your platform (visible expertise) among the people most likely to finance your video and/or buy, duplicate, distribute, promote, and sell your DVD. That’s one way of building additional audiences once you’ve written a plan for making a dog training, dog care, or dog tour video.

Begin by writing a script plan called a treatment emphasizing what is different about your platform (topic of expertise regarding dogs) and what is the fresh news angle regarding your next marketing strategy.

Convince video software distributors, sponsors, agents, retailers, veterinarians, animal health care technicians, groomers, dog camp and dog daycare owners, dog product suppliers/vendors, libraries, schools, breeders, trainers, dog-oriented stores/pet shops, and video retailers or book stores and gift shops as well as your potential viewers that the retail and online markets for your dog DVD is significantly large.

Explain in your script treatment why the audience would be sizable. Picture your video in a catalogue and write brief copy on why your dog video is different than all the others on the market, or what your video emphasizes and with whom it connects. You need to connect with others through the content of your video. What does the video do that other videos skip?

What fresh angle on an old story is presented and how is the presentation different and better? Offer benefits and advantages to vendors and software dealers who might want to market your video or distribute it.

A script, treatment, or springboard (mini-treatment) needs to contain credible, current facts about dogs showing how you will reach that expanded audience. Otherwise you’re headed for a downsizing destination. This happens all too frequently with first time DVD producers that depend on sales statistics. Downsizing occurs when the video you produce commands increasingly smaller sales.

Compare your present market research as to audience appeal to a previous plan, if any. Are the statistics and numbers of viewers growing or shrinking? Producers, video distributors and learning material publishers emphasize dog care, travel, or training have to decide whether your platform expansion and the increase in your audience are worth investing in your video.

If you’re writing a dog training script for a producer, you’ll be given a contract and advanced primarily based on whether your DVD or other type of video poses the least financial risk to your producer and/or distributor. As a producer of dog-care DVDs, you are also ‘hired’ by distributors, other producers, libraries, pet stores, breeders, trainers, and your audience when you pose the least financial risk to the people who finance your script, plan, and/or documentary.

You’ll find various budget differences if you produce a dog training video from a dog-healthcare video. The people you interview for a CELEBRATION OF LIFE dog video would be similar to those you interview for a CELEBRATION OF LIFE person video. For example, you can interview the dog’s veterinarian, the local dog bakery, the dog care spa, the dog camp, the hotel that takes travelers with dogs, the campsite managers, forest rangers who deal with people and dogs at campsites in rural or mountainous areas, even people who chauffeur dogs.

Interview people that design costumes for dogs. Talk to videographers that record dog weddings or shoot close-ups of dogs that appear at weddings, perhaps as ring bearers. Interview those that use dogs for guides, dog therapy people that take dogs into nursing homes and children’s hospitals, and those that rescue dogs or train hearing dogs for the deaf and guide dogs for the visually impaired. For example, what type of dog diets are fed to guide dogs for the blind? Do the diets differ from what most people feed dogs? Is food specialized for each breed?

One possibility might be making a video about dogs with special jobs such as cat-sniffing dogs that find lost cats. Or record dogs at work that sniff certain scents for police or military use—bomb and drug-sniffing dogs and cancer-sniffing dogs that work in medical environments.

You might want to video record the life styles of dogs that come into Yoga studios, dogs that help people, rescue dogs and dog-rescue associations or mountain climbing dogs that rescue people in case of an avalanche.

Your simply video record your own dog in a lifestyle or celebration of life video for the purpose of memorializing your dog for future generations of family and friends. Instead of having your dog stuffed at the taxidermist, your descendants and estate would find it more nourishing and receptive to see videos of your dog in all the stages of growing as a celebration of life salutation and dedication, a living video of your dog at play or at work.

Dogs figure into the lives of many people in a variety of ways from herding sheep to providing behavior studies for dog trainers, dog psychics, and dog enthusiasts.

All you have to do to make a video of your own dog is to aim your camcorder and frame the picture or event as your dog does what the breed tends to do naturally, such as retrieving, playing, working, running, guiding, performing, being loyal to you, or being trained by your clicker device. Decide whether you want to produce dog training or dog-care documentaries, and then draw up a budget to meet your own needs.

The least expensive dog video is the one you take of your own dog with a simple family home video amateur camcorder. All you need to do in that case is save your video on a DVD. Either your camcorder is the type that lets you save your dog video to a DVD and immediately play it in your computer or DVD player.

Or you have an older tape-version camcorder. If you use tape, such as the digital high 8 tape, you’ll need a 1394 FireWire Cable to attach the 4-pin end to your camcorder and the 6-pin USB 2.0 device opposite end to attach to your personal computer’s USB slot.

Then using Microsoft’s Movie Maker, the automatic capture icon will rewind your camcorder and automatically capture your entire video tape, saving it to your personal computer. The next step is to save the movie as a Windows Media File or an .avi file. You have the choice also of automatic or manual saving of the tape.

That way you can choose to edit the tape by having it stop where you want it to stop instead of automatically capturing the entire tape. You are in control of the setting on your computer with Windows Movie Maker. Otherwise, you can use any other type of camcorder-capturing software that saves your video in various file formats that you select.

If you want to upload your video to a Web site, edit it manually and save it as a Windows Media File that will play with Windows Media. You can also save your video as an .avi file or other formats depending upon what software you use to capture your video from your camcorder and save it to your computer.

There is a lot of software on the market that does this. Choose what you prefer depending on whether you use Windows or other operating systems. To edit your video, choose to save the tape manually.

If your camcorder saves to a DVD, then copy the DVD file to your computer hard drive to edit it, and be sure to save it in a format compatible with whatever software you use to edit the video once it is in your computer and saved.

At that point, after editing, you can save it to another size DVD from the tiny DVD in your camcorder. Then label your DVD and prepare to put a label on it using DVD labeling software you can find on the Web at: http://www.burnworld.com/software/cdrburning/label.htm or any other of the Web sites offering software that creates labels for DVDs or CDs. Do a search engine search, for example, on Google with key words, “DVD-labeling software,” and you’ll come up with dozens of Web sites where software is offered either for sale or free, depending upon the Web site. Keep checking as site addresses and offers change.

The important point is decide what type of dog video you are making—your own dog as a celebration of life of the dog and the family through time, or a salable dog video on how-to train or massage your dog, run with your dog, where to camp, travel, or other care-oriented production of people and dogs or dogs playing or working in a scene without human interaction, such as video recording wild or singing dogs of the south Pacific or ancient dogs at various locations, such as an old breed called the Carolina dog, or an ancient breed found in New Guinea or the wild dingoes of Australia.

***

What the book is about

This thoroughly researched book is about how to video record your dog’s life story. Nearly everybody uses a camcorder to take pictures or video clips to put in online scrapbooks to remember dogs as friends for the rest of the dog’s life. Write, finance, and produce a video newsletter of your new puppy. Or make a “this is your life” time capsule of your dog as part of family history saved on a DVD, CD, flash drive or Web site…or mailed to friends and relatives and saved in keepsake heirloom albums. How to Video Record Your Dog's Life Story: Writing, Financing, & Producing Pet Documentaries, Drama, or News is published by ASJA Press, an imprint of iUniverse, Inc (http://www.iuniverse.com). July 2007. ISBN: 978-0-595-45798-4.

 

Make a video on how to run with your dog to relieve stress or produce a documentary on how to meditate or exercise with your dog.

Record in video the way you massage your dog, take your dog to the acupuncturist or discuss acupressure points on dogs, and treat your dog like an athlete. You can save your video in your personal computer, or keep in on a DVD, flash drive, or even upload it to Google or UTube. Maybe you’ll put your dog video in a time capsule or gift box protected from light damage. Then you can keep actual preserved and conserved photos in a scrap book of favorite scenes from the video printed out on photo paper and laminated to keep from fading as quickly.  

Store photos or videos in a cool, dark place, away from water damage and air or breath moisture, perhaps your dog videos might end up as photos enlarged and put on a plaque or framed, or passed from DVD to other disc or chip-like devices where people can view your work on a computer or buy the DVDs from a catalogue, gift, or pet shop, of your dog in any stage of the pet’s life story.

Your dog video is a celebration of life. And just in case you want to take a step further and make the video available to others, you’ll find instruction here on how to write, finance, produce, distribute, publicize, launch, promote, and market dog documentaries on dog training, care, camp, running, walking, sitting, spa activities, knitting, sewing, building, housing, walking on leash, health, nutrition, travel or adventure videos on DVD or similar formats. Link your personal computer and your camcorder together with an audio/video cable for editing your dog documentaries, features, learning materials, courses, or training videos. Write dog-related audio-visual scripts and turn them into reality-based documentaries for information, travel, or education.

Use the Internet’s Web to syndicate and disseminate your content in text, audio, or video formats. Or save your videos to DVDs, flash drives, and other devices for viewing, either interactive or audience-feedback based. Popular subjects for linking your personal computer to your camcorder can be anything from dog-related world or local travel, your lectures, or life issues. You can link your personal computer to the tapes in your camcorder and broadcast at home part time or whatever hours you desire.

Feature travel with dogs or dog-sled adventures or how-to DVDs dealing with dogs. Write, finance, and produce documentary or how-to DVDs showing new approaches to dog training based on dog behavior. Emphasize non-violent techniques to win the dog’s loyalty, love, and trust. Develop a DVD that shows the viewer how to develop enduring bonds of trust with a dog so that the dog cooperates.

Browse this book at the publisher's Web site or read various articles and excerpts at the author's Web site. The author wrote 80+ paperback books currently in print and listed at the Web site and is a member of Dog Writers Association of America, American Society ofJournalists and Authors, and Mensa.

This book shows you, the average dog owner and beginner easy to follow instructions for developing hundreds of creative ways to portray your dog's celebration of life from puppy to maturity and to create all types of videos, video newsletters, DVDs, CDs, flash drive videos, documentaries, training videos, television programs, home video for personal use, along with the act of uploading videos to Web sites or saving them as time capsules or video podcasts.

Capture and celebrate your dog's life in video or virtual reality. Or make professional documentaries about dogs with an easy-to-follow documentary shoestring (low) budget included and sample blank budgets for you to fill in.

In the book titled, How to Video Record Your Dog’s Life Story: Writing, Financing, & Producing Pet Documentaries, Drama, or News, by Anne Hart, published July 2007 by ASJA Press Imprint, iUniverse, Inc. 978-0-595-45798-4, you’ll see sample very low cost budgets for making an easy to understand, cost-effective Dog documentary or video celebrating your dog’s life story. Browse this book at the publisher’s site at http://www.iuniverse.com.

Treat Your Dog Like an Athlete with a Celebration of Life Video

Because your dog deserves to be remembered in all stages of your dog's growing up and being on the job for you as part of your family keepsake album or time capsule video. You may even go for a even virtual reality recording. Or make your dog's life Story into a video computer game. Or a digital scrap book or newsletter.

To simplify, all you may want to do is make a video of your dog at different times. But perhaps you also may want to create a salable DVD about dogs and their care, training, or fun. Nearly everybody uses a camcorder to make videos of the family dog or takes pictures and puts them in a scrapbook to remember a dog as part of a family.

Put your videos on DVDs, Flash Drives, CDs, or save to your computer linked to your camcorder for editing.

From the time you first bring home a new puppy, a “this is your life” video podcast or disc of your dog’s memorable moments can become part of a family history video newsletter or keepsake heirloom album.

Learn how to conserve, protect videos, diaries, scrapbooks, or photos in digital or acid-free paper scrap books. Maybe you’ll put your dog video in a time capsule or gift box protected from light damage.

Then you can keep actual preserved and conserved photos in a scrap book of favorite scenes from the video printed out on photo paper and laminated to keep from fading as quickly. You’ll store it in a cool, dark place, away from water damage and air or breath moisture, perhaps your dog videos might end up as photos enlarged and put on a plaque or framed, or passed from DVD to other disc or chip-like devices where people can view your work on a computer or buy the DVDs from a catalogue, gift, or pet shop, of your dog in any stage of the pet’s life story. Your dog video is a celebration of life. And just in case you want to take a step further and make the video available to others, you’ll find instruction here on how to write, finance, produce, distribute, publicize, launch, promote, and market dog documentaries on dog training, care, camp, running, walking, sitting, spa activities, knitting, sewing, building, housing, walking on leash, health, nutrition, travel or adventure videos on DVD or similar formats.

Use your personal computer and your camcorder linked together for editing your dog documentaries, features, learning materials, courses, or training videos. Write dog-related audio-visual scripts and turn them into reality-based documentaries for information, travel, or education. Use the Internet’s Web to syndicate and disseminate your content in text, audio, or video formats. Or save your videos to DVDs, flash drives, and other devices for viewing, either interactive or audience-feedback based. Popular subjects for linking your personal computer to your camcorder can be anything from dog-related world or local travel, your lectures, or life issues.

You can link your personal computer to the tapes in your camcorder and broadcast at home part time or whatever hours you desire. Feature travel with dogs or dog-sled adventures or how-to DVDs dealing with dogs. Write, finance, and produce documentary or how-to DVDs showing new approaches to dog training based on dog behavior. Emphasize non-violent techniques to win the dog’s loyalty, love, and trust. Develop a DVD that shows the viewer how to develop enduring bonds of trust with a dog so that the dog cooperates. Your DVD doesn’t have to show negative approaches or those images of doggy torture chambers from old days past training that focused solely on “leashes and collars or tethers” or cages that restricted dogs. The dog need not be put on a tether in some yard to show how a dog is trained.

Keep away from negative methods of the past. Instead create a learning environment in a how-to training video. You solve a problem in training by teaching the dog positive associations with the handler. Your DVD needs to compare negative associations a dog can figure out that might increase aggression in dominant dogs with positive associations and alternative gentle training methods. Don’t control the dog by punishment. You don’t have to encourage aggression or dog resentment and mistrust. Instead, your dog training or care DVD can focus on gentle methods such as clicker conditioning and similar methods that emphasize creating wonderfully positive.

Before you even start a plan for your dog DVD, talk to a few book authors that offer a variety of new and gentle approaches. The book suggests a variety of creative ideas. For example, It's an unnatural role for a person to be the alpha pack leader of dogs. Make a dog video showing a different approach to clicker conditioning, emphasizing effective training techniques. Do your research homework. Interview dog experts. Then record your dog's life story.

Then record your dog's life story for the future or market dog camp or training and behavior videos. Browse book title listed online or with the publisher, or at Amazon or some other booksellers online. See: How to Video Record Your Dog's Life Story: Writing, Financing, & Producing Pet Documentaries, Drama, or News.