21 Following
annehart

annehart

Walking mindfully

Try chi walking for balance and posture.

Photo and salad by Anne Hart.

 

If you tire quickly from the usual exercises for fitness offered in your area, such as chair yoga or walking mornings or even strolling, you may be interested in trying very slow, sustained movements as exercise such as chi walking, a healing form similar to tai chi and qi gong based on posture and alignment while strolling or walking. An excellent site for preventing falls with Chi walking is "Tai Chi Walking for Seniors - Tai Chi Falls Prevention." Here's how to start doing Chi walking for posture and balance.

 

You begin by aligning yourself physically with your posture. Then you align yourself emotionally with your intentions, which is your purpose: What you will be doing. It's about moving with a specific posture for balance.

 

Next, in your second step, here's how to find your 'core.' It's your lower abdominal muscles. You energize your lower abdominal muscles mentally by using your intention or will power to create a feeling of balance in your core. You can do slow movements with your arms and feet for balance for 45 minutes without getting as tired as you would with faster exercises or movements. The key is balance, posture, and slow, steady movements in a healing frame of mind.

 

The third step is to radiate the balance you're now feeling

 

That balance is centered between your upper and lower body. Are you feeling balanced as opposed to off-center or off balance physically? When you experience that balance between your upper and lower body now develop balance between your right side and your left side thinking of your body moving horizontally across your both sides.

 

Focus on a point midway between your left side and your right side. Picture a line drawn horizontally between each side moving across your body halfway between your upper and lower body. The midpoint should feel balanced and steady on your feet with your weight evenly divided.

 

Now choose to physically walk in such way that you're creating health with each step. Right now it's all about choice. You're mentally choosing health, a new way of strolling that feels balanced and healthy as you take each step forward.

 

It's about positive and relaxed posture while walking or running slowly

 

Posture can be positive by centering your core for balance. Just moving slowly is an act of positive emotion as mind and body become one unit. Finally, you walk forward with no tension in your stride. You're now walking healthier and with ease.

 

You're achieving this healthy energy life force walk by concentrating on each slow step as being mindful. Be sure to look both ways for traffic if you're walking in Sacramento's curbs where there are no sidewalks. And watch your step for the runoff of water from lawns that drain into those curbs.

 

Check out the book called Chi Walking. It's at the Amazon.com website. See, ChiWalking: Fitness Walking for Lifelong Health and Energy - Amazon. Chi walking isn't only for slow movement for seniors and very young children. It's also for runners. The author works with runners preparing to run marathons.

 

Chi Walking also is good for people with varying disabilities who need to walk slowly for exercise

 

Chi walking and Chi running also has been used with those who have been told they could never run. The idea behind the training is to run a lot slower and more mindfully. The reason why is it's all about good posture. For Chi running strategies, see the website, "Chi Running Techniques - soundstrue.com." For Chi walking techniques, you can check out the YouTube video, "Chi Walking DVD Trailer."

 

You may want to read the to see how walking this way can become the new you when you are walking this way. It's a gradual process of development. There's a mental or emotional aspect to Chi walking and Chi running. It begins with good posture. If you can touch where the tension is, you can focus on relaxing that point of tension.

 

You might talk to your local chiropractor, physical therapist, or acupuncturist about where to learn more about chi walking or take local classes. You may want to work with people practicing chi walking or teaching classes or find support buddies to walk with. Take it slowly because progress with Chi walking does take time to develop gradually. It's about a slow building progress.

 

For further information on this topic read the article "Pathways to Healing," by Elain Zablocki, which is all about Chi walking and offers resources and websites on the subject in her article. See page 20 of the magazine Townsend Letter, June 2012 issue.

You can learn more about Chi Walking opportunities at the website, Walking: Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong, Meditation. You can learn Chi Walking or Chi Running from a DVD, e-book, or take classes with local instructors such as the following who offer the techniques.

 

More Chi Running instruction

 

You can take Chi running classes. Check out the Chi Running site. See Danny Dreyer's website, Chi Running. Also see the videos, Danny Dreyer "Chi Running" - YouTube and Danny Dreyer on Pronating when Running - YouTube. For Chi walking, also see the site about the DVD on Chi Walking, Chi Walking.

 

Danny Dreyer and Katherine Dreyer have written books on Chi Walking and Chi Running. Check out the Author Video. Danny Dreyer and Katherine Dreyer also are the authors of the book, Chi Marathon, whereby he authors show runners the best way to recover from running a marathon. See the book, Chi Running by Danny Dreyer and the book, Chi Marathon

 

To learn more about Chi Walking, check out the Chi Walking site. You can find an instructor, learn on your own, find DVDs on Chi Walking, or train to become a Chi Walking instructor or a Chi Running teacher/instructor. Information is at the Chi Living website. Chi Marathon is now available in eBook format.

 

Chi Living Nutrition Guidelines

 

Eating high Chi foods includes organic fruits and vegetables, legumes, lean meats or fish and non-processed, freshly prepared meals. It's about eating at regular times: having breakfast, lunch and dinner at consistent, rhythmic intervals, without grazing, supports efficient digestion and absorption of nutrients.

 

How do you eat mindfully? You allow yourself to get hungry, slow down when you eat, chew well, enjoy the tastes, textures and colors and be grateful for the food and those who prepared it. You can find Chi Living recipes, at the Chi Living website. The links include shopping lists and nutritional suggestions provide a gateway to healthy living by providing you with sound advice on food choices and planning.

 

Check out the Chi Walking and Chi Running books. There are sections dedicated to nutritional advice including sensible suggestions for weight release, fueling for events and keeping trim. Also see the Sacramento Bee article, Tai Chi Walking - Find n Save - The Sacramento Bee. Also check out the book, Tai Chi Walking: A Low-Impact Path to Better Health, by Robert Chuckrow, Ph.D. It's also offered and highly reviewed at Amazon.com.

 

One of hottest health trends lately has been Chi walking, which is building strength through gradual activity, as in Tai chi stepping while strolling, working with gravity, and using good posture when taking small strides. Chi means energy and/or life force. First you develop the form of walking and then you adjust to it. For the runners, there's also Chi running.

 

Walking can help you develop confidence and resilience in your stride which can lead to the same in your voice. People who practice Chi walking also are using it as a metaphor for their life as they generate positive energy. They put pep in their step by slow mindful walking instead of the fast power walking phenomenon of the 1990s.

 

Mind-body-fitness-wellness with slow-moving exercise or activity

 

This approach is about combining mind-body approaches to fitness and wellness with a slow range of activity over short distances. It's ideal for all ages. You can even do it competitively if you choose challenges.

 

According to new studies, exercise is not good for 10 percent of healthy people studied and could lead to heart risks. See the May 31, 2012 Sacramento Bee article, "Exercise causes heart risks to grow for about 10 percent of people." But what may be more helpful is slow, mindful Chi walking.

 

Working with gravity by using posture for balance and mindfulness

 

Working with gravity helps you maintain your balance physically and mentally. Many people of all ages sit at a desk all day. Chi means energy. It's about positive feeling and thinking. It's about alignment and movement focusing on balance and ease instead of tension and stress. That's why it's also called mindful walking.

 

Check out the YouTube "Internal Disclipline in the Tai Chi Walk" video and compare it to the video about Chi walking in general, Chi Walking, which is about strengthening your core muscles by making changes in how you walk and re-learning your body's walking patterns.

 

Learn to strengthen your core muscles by lengthening the back of your neck instead of slouching when you walk. Don't lead with your hips with your head forward in a slouch posture when you walk, for example, when learning to do Chi walking. You lean with your upper body when you walk. That's basically the Chi walking posture.

 

Fora further information on this type of posture, see the YouTube video, "Chi Walking 100 Days, Lesson 1: Posture," which specifically gives you the postures you need to learn to do Chi walking and help increase your lung capacity as you build your core muscles.In this video, Danny Dreyer teaches the posture elements of Chi walking. You're leading with your upper body not your hips when you do Chi walking.

 

The idea is that in some areas where there are no sidewalks the very old and the very young nondrivers needed some form of activity at least to practice on good air days where they could move at their own pace and speeds.

 

It's not only about moving your legs in coordination with your whole body. It's more about mind-body integration. Your entire body is moving holistically. You are moving mentally, emotionally, and physically as you walk.

 

Walking is not only physically stepping

 

There are two forms of Chi pacing: Chi walking and Chi running. Both were developed by runner, Danny Dreyer who studied Tai Chi exercises for years. The whole purpose of Chi walking is to develop walking as a practice in mindfulness.

 

Mindfulness is defined as using inner experience to be in touch with the present moment without evaluating, scoring, or judging your inner experience. You own your inner experience. You are not supposed to evaluate inner experiences. Mindfulness is when you look at any thoughts that cross your mind just as passing images instead of judging what you experience as positive or negative.

 

The origin of mindfulness can be found in Zen Buddhism. However, when applied to secular health practices, mindfulness is used by numerous mental health practitioners with health benefits when used for de-stressing, meditation, and relaxation.

Try chi walking for balance and posture

 

As an older adult, if you tire quickly from the usual exercises for fitness offered in your area, such as chair yoga or walking mornings or even strolling, you may be interested in trying very slow, sustained movements as exercise such as chi walking, a healing form similar to tai chi and qi gong based on posture and alignment while strolling or walking.

You begin by aligning yourself physically with your posture. Then you align yourself emotionally with your intentions, which is your purpose: What you will be doing. It's about moving with a specific posture for balance.

 

Next, in your second step, here's how to find your 'core.' It's your lower abdominal muscles. You energize your lower abdominal muscles mentally by using your intention or will power to create a feeling of balance in your core. You can do slow movements with your arms and feet for balance for 45 minutes without getting as tired as you would with faster exercises or movements. The key is balance, posture, and slow, steady movements in a healing frame of mind.

 

Chi walking.
Anne Hart, illustration and photography.

Chi walking.

The third step is to radiate the balance you're now feeling

That balance is centered between your upper and lower body. Are you feeling balanced as opposed to off-center or off balance physically? When you experience that balance between your upper and lower body now develop balance between your right side and your left side thinking of your body moving horizontally across your both sides.

 

Focus on a point midway between your left side and your right side. Picture a line drawn horizontally between each side moving across your body halfway between your upper and lower body. The midpoint should feel balanced and steady on your feet with your weight evenly divided.

 

Now choose to physically walk in such way that you're creating health with each step. Right now it's all about choice. You're mentally choosing health, a new way of strolling that feels balanced and healthy as you take each step forward.

Chi walking (Palace of Fine Arts) area, San Francisco.
(Palace of Fine Arts) area, San Francisco. Anne Hart, Photography.
It's about positive and relaxed posture while walking or running slowly

Posture can be positive by centering your core for balance. Just moving slowly is an act of positive emotion as mind and body become one unit. Finally, you walk forward with no tension in your stride. You're now walking healthier and with ease.

 

You're achieving this healthy energy life force walk by concentrating on each slow step as being mindful. Be sure to look both ways for traffic if you're walking in the curbs where there are no sidewalks. And watch your step for the runoff of water from lawns that drain into those curbs.

 

Check out the book called Chi Walking. It's at the Amazon.com website. See, ChiWalking: Fitness Walking for Lifelong Health and Energy - Amazon. Chi walking isn't only for slow movement for seniors and very young children. It's also for runners. The author works with runners preparing to run marathons.

 

American River pedestrian/bike path, Sacramento, CA.
American River pedestrian/bike path, Sacramento, CA. Anne Hart, Photography.
Chi Walking also is good for people with varying disabilities who need to walk slowly for exercise

Chi walking and Chi running also has been used with those who have been told they could never run. The idea behind the training is to run a lot slower and more mindfully. The reason why is it's all about good posture.

 

You may want to read the to see how walking this way can become the new you when you are walking this way. It's a gradual process of development. There's a mental or emotional aspect to Chi walking and Chi running. It begins with good posture. If you can touch where the tension is, you can focus on relaxing that point of tension.

 

Chi walking for health.
Anne Hart, Illustration and Photography.

Chi walking for health

 

Chi Walking also has been used with people having varying disabilities who need to walk slowly for exercise
 

Chi walking and Chi running also has been used with those who have been told they could never run. The idea behind the training is to run a lot slower and more mindfully. The reason why is it's all about good posture.

 

You may want to read the to see how walking this way can become the new you when you are walking this way. It's a gradual process of development. There's a mental or emotional aspect to Chi walking and Chi running. It begins with good posture. If you can touch where the tension is, you can focus on relaxing that point of tension.

 

You might talk to your local chiropractor, physical therapist, or acupuncturist about where to learn more about chi walking or take local classes. You may want to work with people practicing chi walking or teaching classes or find support buddies to walk with. Take it slowly because progress with Chi walking does take time to develop gradually. It's about a slow building progress.

 

For further information on this topic read the article "Pathways to Healing," by Elain Zablocki, which is all about Chi walking and offers resources and websites on the subject in her article. See page 20 of the magazine Towsend Letter, June 2012 issue.

You can learn more about Chi Walking opportunities at the website, Walking: Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong, Meditation. You can learn Chi Walking or Chi Running from a DVD, e-book, or take classes with local instructors.

 

Preventive medicine for rookies: Consumer reviews.
Preventive medicine for rookies: Consumer reviews. Anne Hart, Photography, Illustration, and book.
Chi Walking also is good for people with varying disabilities who need to walk slowly for exercise
 

Chi walking and Chi running also has been used with those who have been told they could never run. The idea behind the training is to run a lot slower and more mindfully. The reason why is it's all about good posture.

 

You may want to read the to see how walking this way can become the new you when you are walking this way. It's a gradual process of development. There's a mental or emotional aspect to Chi walking and Chi running. It begins with good posture. If you can touch where the tension is, you can focus on relaxing that point of tension.

 

You might talk to your local chiropractor, physical therapist, or acupuncturist about where to learn more about chi walking or take local classes. You may want to work with people practicing chi walking or teaching classes or find support buddies to walk with. Take it slowly because progress with Chi walking does take time to develop gradually. It's about a slow building progress.

 

For further information on this topic read the article "Pathways to Healing," by Elain Zablocki, which is all about Chi walking and offers resources and websites on the subject in her article. See page 20 of the magazine Townsend Letter, June 2012 issue.

You can learn more about Chi Walking opportunities at the website, Walking: Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong, Meditation. You can learn Chi Walking or Chi Running from a DVD, e-book, or take classes with local instructors such as the following who offer the techniques.

 

How to safely tailor your food, medicines, and cosmetics to your genes.
How to safely tailor your food, medicines, and cosmetics to your genes. Anne Hart, Illustration, Photography and Book.
Chi Walking also is good for people with varying disabilities who need to walk slowly for exercise

Chi walking and Chi running also has been used with those who have been told they could never run. The idea behind the training is to run a lot slower and more mindfully. The reason why is it's all about good posture.

 

You may want to read the to see how walking this way can become the new you when you are walking this way. It's a gradual process of development. There's a mental or emotional aspect to Chi walking and Chi running. It begins with good posture. If you can touch where the tension is, you can focus on relaxing that point of tension.

 

You might talk to your local chiropractor, physical therapist, or acupuncturist about where to learn more about chi walking or take local classes. You may want to work with people practicing chi walking or teaching classes or find support buddies to walk with. Take it slowly because progress with Chi walking does take time to develop gradually. It's about a slow building progress.

 

For further information on this topic read the article "Pathways to Healing," by Elain Zablocki, which is all about Chi walking and offers resources and websites on the subject in her article. See page 20 of the magazine Towsend Letter, June 2012 issue.

 

You can learn more about Chi Walking opportunities at the website, Walking: Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong, Meditation. You can learn Chi Walking or Chi Running from a DVD, e-book, or take classes with local instructors such as the following who offer the techniques.

 

There's chi running and chi walking
Anne Hart, Photography and Book.

There's chi running and chi walking

 

For further information on this topic read the article "Pathways to Healing," by Elain Zablocki, which is all about Chi walking and offers resources and websites on the subject in her article. See page 20 of the magazine Townsend Letter, June 2012 issue.

You can learn more about Chi Walking opportunities at the website, Walking: Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong, Meditation. You can learn Chi Walking or Chi Running from a DVD, e-book, or take classes with local instructors such as the following who offer the techniques.

 

Where to find instruction in Chi running and/or Chi walking

For example, you might talk to chiropractors who use chi walking or chi running in their practice. You also may wish to take Chi running classes. Check out the Chi Running site. See Danny Dreyer's website, Chi Running. Also see the videos, Danny Dreyer "Chi Running" - YouTube and Danny Dreyer on Pronating when Running - YouTube. For Chi walking, also see the site about the DVD on Chi Walking, Chi Walking.

 

Danny Dreyer and Katherine Dreyer have written books on Chi Walking and Chi Running. Check out the Author Video. Danny Dreyer and Katherine Dreyer also are the authors of the book, Chi Marathon, whereby he authors show runners the best way to recover from running a marathon. See the book, Chi Running by Danny Dreyer and the book, Chi Marathon.

 

To learn more about Chi Walking, check out the Chi Walking site. You can find an instructor, learn on your own, find DVDs on Chi Walking, or train to become a Chi Walking instructor or a Chi Running teacher/instructor. Information is at the Chi Living website. Chi Marathon is now available in eBook format.

 

Neurotechnology with Culinary Memoirs.
Neurotechnology with Culinary Memoirs. Anne Hart, book.
Chi Living Nutrition Guidelines

 

Eating high Chi foods includes organic fruits and vegetables, legumes, lean meats or fish and non-processed, freshly prepared meals. It's about eating at regular times: having breakfast, lunch and dinner at consistent, rhythmic intervals, without grazing, supports efficient digestion and absorption of nutrients.

 

How do you eat mindfully? You allow yourself to get hungry, slow down when you eat, chew well, enjoy the tastes, textures and colors and be grateful for the food and those who prepared it. You can find Chi Living recipes, at the Chi Living website. The links include shopping lists and nutritional suggestions provide a gateway to healthy living by providing you with sound advice on food choices and planning.

 

Check out the Chi Walking and Chi Running books. There are sections dedicated to nutritional advice including sensible suggestions for weight release, fueling for events and keeping trim. Also see the Sacramento Bee article, Tai Chi Walking - Find n Save - The Sacramento Bee. Also check out the book, Tai Chi Walking: A Low-Impact Path to Better Health, by Robert Chuckrow, Ph.D. It's also offered and highly reviewed at Amazon.com.

 

One of hottest health trends lately has been Chi walking, which is building strength through gradual activity, as in Tai chi stepping while strolling, working with gravity, and using good posture when taking small strides. Chi means energy and/or life force. First you develop the form of walking and then you adjust to it. For the runners, there's also Chi running.

 

Walking can help you develop confidence and resilience in your stride which can lead to the same in your voice. People who practice Chi walking also are using it as a metaphor for their life as they generate positive energy. They put pep in their step by slow mindful walking instead of the fast power walking phenomenon of the 1990s.

 

Mind-body-fitness-wellness with slow-moving exercise or activity

 

This approach is about combining mind-body approaches to fitness and wellness with a slow range of activity over short distances. It's ideal for all ages. You can even do it competitively if you choose challenges.

According to new studies, exercise is not good for 10 percent of healthy people studied and could lead to heart risks. See the May 31, 2012 Sacramento Bee article, "Exercise causes heart risks to grow for about 10 percent of people." But what may be more helpful is slow, mindful Chi walking.

 

Working with gravity by using posture for balance and mindfulness

Working with gravity helps you maintain your balance physically and mentally. Many Sacramentans of all ages sit at a desk all day. Chi means energy. It's about positive feeling and thinking. It's about alignment and movement focusing on balance and ease instead of tension and stress. That's why it's also called mindful walking.

 

Check out the YouTube "Internal Disclipline in the Tai Chi Walk" video and compare it to the video about Chi walking in general, Chi Walking, which is about strengthening your core muscles by making changes in how you walk and re-learning your body's walking patterns.

 

Learn to strengthen your core muscles by lengthening the back of your neck instead of slouching when you walk. Don't lead with your hips with your head forward in a slouch posture when you walk, for example, when learning to do Chi walking. You lean with your upper body when you walk. That's basically the Chi walking posture.

 

Fora further information on this type of posture, see the YouTube video, "Chi Walking 100 Days, Lesson 1: Posture," which specifically gives you the postures you need to learn to do Chi walking and help increase your lung capacity as you build your core muscles.In this video, Danny Dreyer teaches the posture elements of Chi walking. You're leading with your upper body not your hips when you do Chi walking.

 

The idea is that in some areas of Sacramento where there are no sidewalks the very old and the very young nondrivers needed some form of activity at least to practice on good air days where they could move at their own pace and speeds.

It's not only about moving your legs in coordination with your whole body. It's more about mind-body integration. Your entire body is moving holistically. You are moving mentally, emotionally, and physically as you walk.

 

Walking is not only physically stepping

 

There are two forms of Chi pacing: Chi walking and Chi running. Both were developed by runner, Danny Dreyer who studied Tai Chi exercises for years. The whole purpose of Chi walking is to develop walking as a practice in mindfulness.

 

Mindfulness is defined as using inner experience to be in touch with the present moment without evaluating, scoring, or judging your inner experience. You own your inner experience. You are not supposed to evaluate inner experiences. Mindfulness is when you look at any thoughts that cross your mind just as passing images instead of judging what you experience as positive or negative.

 

The origin of mindfulness can be found in Zen Buddhism. However, when applied to secular health practices, mindfulness is used by numerous mental health practitioners with health benefits when used for de-stressing, meditation, and relaxation.

 

Can individuals benefit from programs that stimulate and engage people in exercise as well as provide social learning environments with sound benefits, even when the persons have dementia?

 

The Happy Antics program was able to stimulate and engage people with dementia in exercise as well as provide a social learning environment and offer potential psychological benefits. You may wish to check out the abstract of this new study, "The Happy Antics program: Holistic exercise for people with dementia," published online since March 1, 2014 in the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. (The publisher is Elsevier Health Sciences.)

 

The program is part of a new study that shows dementia patients benefit from holistic exercise program. Pairing cognitive activities with physical movements helps patients and care-givers alike, according to the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies.

 

Exercise has been shown to improve physical and psychological wellbeing

 

Whereas dementia patients can often suffer from depression and declining physical and mental ability, exercise has been shown to help improve both their physical and psychological wellbeing. Researchers at Teesside University in the U.K. investigated how combining cognitive activities and elements of yoga, tai chi, qigong and meditation with routine physical exercise affected dementia patients. They found that a holistic exercise program focusing on both mind and body can help improve quality of life for dementia patients.

 

For this study, conducted in association with the Alzheimer's Society (UK), researchers developed the Happy Antics program, a holistic exercise plan that integrates physical movements with activities designed to take the emotional, intellectual, social, and spiritual health of patients into consideration. Each Happy Antics session started with a short cognitive exercise during which participants were shown a picture of an object while the instructor spoke briefly about it. Then patients were encouraged to discuss the object and ask questions.

 

This activity was followed by warm-up exercises and then physical exercise incorporating principals of tai chi, yoga, qigong, and dance movements. Each session ended with a short, guided meditation activity that focused on breathing and mindful awareness.

 

Fifteen participants ranging from 52 to 86 years old attended the program: eight dementia patients, five care-givers, and two volunteers. The overall attendance rate for six sessions was 70%, and all participants reported having enjoyed taking part in the holistic exercise sessions, looked forward to attending them, and felt like the sessions helped them socially. Some patients also said they felt more relaxed after the sessions and experienced some degree of pain relief. Other patients found learning to do the new exercises "empowering," even though sometimes they faced physical difficulty performing the tasks.

 

"When the wellness approach is applied to exercise, holistic exercise strives to encourage individuals not only to take part in the physical activities, but also to become aware of their own physical and psychological states, and to perform exercise that is purposeful and meaningful to them," explained lead investigator Yvonne J-Lyn Khoo, BSc (Hons), MSc, PhD, according to the May 19, 2014 news release, "Study shows dementia patients benefit from holistic exercise program." Yvonne J-Lyn Khoo is from the Health and Social Care Institute, Teesside University.

 

Participants showed improvement in memory recall in their anticipation of the physical movements associated with the music

 

The holistic mind-and-body approach proved to be both enjoyable and helpful for patients suffering from dementia. Not only did they like the sessions, but also showed improvement in memory recall in their anticipation of the physical movements associated with the music. You also may wish to see the article, "Study Shows Dementia Patients Benefit from Holistic Exercise."

 

"Observations at the sixth session showed that even though people with dementia could not remember what had occurred during previous sessions, six people with dementia who participated in the holistic exercise sessions could anticipate the physical movements associated with specific music and three people with dementia were able to remember the sequence of the physical movements," said Dr. Khoo. "This showed potential in maintained procedural memory among people with dementia who attended the holistic exercise sessions."

 

The Happy Antics program included participation by care-givers

 

While the program helped dementia patients, it also had positive effects on the other participants, with one care-giver reporting less pain after attending the sessions. This particular finding of pain relief after participating in holistic exercise is an important one given the unique complexity of chronic pain. "This suggests that participating in holistic exercise may offer some relief in burden for care-givers as they face many challenges in providing care for patients with dementia, including physical and psychological distress," added Dr. Khoo, according to the news release.

 

Dementia is a complex and debilitating condition, but with holistic exercise programs like Happy Antics, patients experienced some relief, joy, and lasting positive effects. "The Happy Antics program was able to stimulate and engage people with dementia in exercise as well as provide a social learning environment and offer potential psychological benefits," concluded Dr. Khoo. You also may wish to take a look at the abstract of another study, "Yoga meets positive psychology: Examining the integration of hedonic (gratitude) and eudaimonic (meaning) wellbeing in relation to the extent of yoga practice."