21 Following
annehart

annehart

Ever notice how some newspapers and TV ads use 'bad' grammar to save space or time?

Here are some grammar tips for public speakers and writers

 

Photo and book by Anne Hart.

 

Here are some grammar tips for public speakers and writers. The correct grammar is to leave out the pronoun 'he' or 'she' or 'it' when you name the person or object. Here are examples: Right: My teacher said to eat breakfast. Wrong: My teacher, she said to eat breakfast.

The reason why you leave out he or she or it when you name the person or object such as my relative, my boss, my client, is that you don't want to be redundant. You don't want to say what you mean twice in one sentence. So the right way is to leave out the he or she when you mention the person's name or title. Example: My cousin tinted her hair.

That's good grammar. Wrong grammar or speech would be: My cousin: She tinted her hair. The audience already knows you mentioned your cousin (or anyone else by title or name). You don't need to put in the he, she or it after you state the person's name or title.

The reason this is mentioned is that you hear it sometimes on television infomercials and commercials where a celebrity or other popular person interviewed starts a sentence with "my ____she told me..."

Another grammar no-no is using 'if' instead of 'whether.' Newspapers use it in headlines or articles to save. Example "He didn't know whether to accept the job." That's correct. But a lot of newspapers use if instead of whether when deciding.

The correct way to use the word 'if' is in sentences such as "If the product sells, then we'll design another one." Or: "I'll visit that city if it doesn't rain that day." The correct way to use whether is, "They can tell whether the material is wool or nylon." Or: "Let me know whether you want to buy that gadget."